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Youth Topics is a service of the Center for Children and Families, Department of Community and Human Services, City of Alexandria.  It is produced by Jacqueline Coachman, DCHS Office of Youth Services. 

Subscribe here. Make inquiries here. Youth Topics is posted online here. 

 

In the January 29 Edition: 

Events
Youth Voice Alexandria (January 29)
OJJDP Mentoring Workshop (January 30)
College Financial Aid Workshop (January 31)
School Facilities Work Group (February 3)
Healthcare Career Fair (February 10)
Bullying Prevention Programs (February 19)
Parent Leadership Training Institute Fundraiser (March 1)
National Conference on Health and Domestic Violence (March 19-21)
35th Annual Salute to Women Awards (March 26)
Restorative Justice – Guiding Principles for Communities and Organizations (April 27)
SCAN’s 3rd Annual Croquet Day (May 30)

Careers/Volunteerism 
Scholarship Program Urges 7th Graders to Take Massive Open Online Courses
White House Student Film Festival
DC Water Summer Internship Program
DreamUP! Career Exploration Program
Virginia Forum on Tobacco Use Call for Posters
National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Awards
Out of the Box Prize
Parents Empowered Educational Support Group
AMA Foundation Minority Scholars Award Program Invites Applications
Generous U Competition
Allies in Prevention Awards
Salute to Women Award Call for Nominations
Society of Pediatric Psychology Accepting Applications for Diversity Research Grants
American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Accepting Application for Pilot Research Awards
‘Shark Tank’ Competition for Innovative Epilepsy Products
Enhancing Life Project Seeking Letters of Intent for Scholarly Projects
SAPCA January Newsletter

Grantsmanship
DCHS Office of Youth Services Listing of Grant Opportunities
 

Research & Resources 
ACPS Sees Historic Rise in AP Exam Results, Participation
ACPS Adds 22 More Courses to Its Curriculum
School Board Approves Honor Code for All Secondary Students
Google Commits to Pledge on Student-Data Privacy
Condoleezza Rice Tapped to Lead K-12 Advocacy Group Founded by Jeb Bush
Bill to End A-F Accountability Before It Begins Advances in Virginia
10 Tips for Setting Successful Goals with Students
Back to School: Exploring Promising Practices for Re-engaging Young People in Secondary Education
Preparing to Launch: Early Childhood’s Academic Countdown
Early-Childhood Education in the U.S.: An Analysis
Chronic Absenteeism Challenges D. C. Public Schools’ Preschool Program
Not Enrolled in Preschool: A State-by-State Breakdown
Hispanic Preschool Participation Varies by State
New Measures Help Build Relationships between Families and Early Care and Education Providers
Day-Care Providers to Partner with Head Start
Doctors Enlisted to Deliver Early-Literacy Message
Bus Brings Computers to Kids After School
Shaking the Money Tree: Sources for After-School Funding
Afterschool Programs for Low-Income Children Endangered by Proposed Senate Bill
Majority of Public School Students Now Considered Low-Income
Does the ’30 Million-Word Gap’ Have Gap in Authenticity?
States’ Efforts to Close Achievement Gap Examined in New Report
Schools Help Close Racial Gaps in Arts Education
YouTube Series Turn Classic Literature into Modern Video Blogs
Teacher Licensing Program for Veterans Working
Owning Pets Has Pros and Cons for Homeless Youth
Many Former Foster Youth Unaware of New Health Care Benefits
Helping Youth and Families Get Affordable Care Act Health Coverage
Young Family Caregivers Face Many Struggles, Get Little Support
Girls with Same-Sex Partners More Likely to Report Relationship Abuse
Cyber-Bullying Happens Less Often than In-Person Bullying
Bullying and Suicidal Ideation and Behaviors: A Meta-Analysis
Broader Picture of International Education Progress Unveiled in Study
Maryland Grooms Assistant Principals to Take Schools’ Top Jobs

Workshops & Webinars 
Mediation: Preparing for a Difficult Conversation – Part 1 (On-Demand)

Events

Youth Voice Alexandria (January 29)
Youth Voice Alexandria is an initiative of the City of Alexandria designed to help youth and young adults succeed by improving the mental health, child welfare, education and juvenile justice systems. The next meeting is from 3:30-5 p.m. in Room A104 at T.C. Williams High School (3330 King Street). For more information or to RSVP, contact Jeremy Long (703.470.0506).

OJJDP Mentoring Workshop (January 30)
A live stream will be available for the workshop “Effective Program Practices in Mentoring Programs Serving At-Risk Youth” at the 2015 National Mentoring Summit. The workshop will highlight research, programs, and practices conducted under the Mentoring Best Practices Research initiative of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP). 

College Financial Aid Workshop (January 31)
The Scholarship Fund of Alexandria is hosting a FAFSA Completion Workshop in the Rotunda Room, T.C. Williams Main Campus (3330 King Street) to help seniors and their families complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Financial aid professionals will be available to provide free, confidential assistance. The application takes less than 30 minutes; drop by anytime between 9 a.m. and Noon to enjoy free snacks while completing the application.

School Facilities Work Group (February 3)
The City of Alexandria and ACPS are jointly developing a Long Range Educational Facilities Plan to improve facilities planning, accommodate the growing student population, and enhance educational programs and services. The next meeting is February 3 at 6 p.m. at the ACPS Central Office (1340 Braddock Place, 3rd Floor, Room 310-3A). The public is invited to all meetings of the work group and is encouraged to stay informed regarding upcoming meetings through the City of Alexandria eNews. Contact ACPS Facilities Planner and GIS Specialist Laurel Hammig (703.619.8298) for additional information.

Healthcare Career Fair (February 10)
The event is from 12-1:30 p.m. at Stratford University (7777 Leesburg Pike, Falls Church, 5th Floor, Jefferson Room) and is open to the general public. The deadline for registration is February 8.

Bullying Prevention Programs (February 19)
The 60-minute audio offers insight into the federal and private funders who are the backbone of the effort to reduce instances of bullying as well as the techniques and resources needed to make an impact.

Parent Leadership Training Institute (PLTI) Fundraiser (March 1)
The highlight of the annual PLTI fundraiser will be the 20th anniversary production of Bessie’s Blues, featuring Helen Hayes Award winner Bernardine Mitchell as Bessie Smith. The fundraiser sponsored by Abaca Imports and MetroStage will feature a dinner buffet and silent auction at 5:30 p.m. The performance will start at 7 p.m. Tickets are $85 per person for the dinner and show. Contact Fay Slotnik (703.409.6872) for tickets or information regarding ads or sponsorships.

National Conference on Health and Domestic Violence (March 19-21)
Futures Without Violence will host the conference in Washington, D.C. Topics will include sexual assault on college campuses, the social determinants of health, and sex trafficking of youth. Sessions will also include presentations addressing children’s exposure to violence and the Defending Childhood initiative.

35th Annual Salute to Women Awards (March 26)
The Alexandria Commission for Women celebrates outstanding women, men, and youth who have made a significant impact on women and girls in Alexandria. In addition to recognizing community leaders, this year’s event will commemorate the 40th anniversary of the Alexandria Sexual Assault Center. The awards ceremony and cocktail reception will begin at 6 p.m. at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s Madison Auditorium (600 Dulany Street).

Restorative Justice – Guiding Principles for Communities and Organizations (April 27)
The philosophy of restorative justice in an invitation to look beyond a punitive view of justice and discipline and focus on the needs of everyone involved, emphasizing direct accountability, reparation, prevention, dialogue and, in some cases, renewed relationship. The workshop at the Hilton Crystal City (2399 Jefferson Davis Highway) is from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

SCAN’s 3rd Annual Croquet Day (May 30)
The event will take place from Noon until 4 p.m. at Hensley Park (4200 Eisenhower Avenue), featuring croquet with practice green (no experience required); food, beer and soda; and games and activities for the entire family.

Careers/Volunteerism 

Scholarship Program Urges 7th Graders to Take Massive Open Online Courses
Seventh grade students who take an online course designed for advanced high school and college-level students now can improve their chances of getting a scholarship from the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation, which receives about 1,000 applications each year for 65 spots in its Young Scholars Program. Designed for high-performing, low-income students, the precollege scholarship provides students beginning in the 8th grade with individualized academic advising, financial support, and access to academic and extracurricular activities. It has the potential to fund students through college with up to $40,000 a year as a last-dollar scholarship to cover expenses such as a musical instrument, computer, study abroad experience, or to pay college tuition. To generate more interest and awareness of the program, the foundation has partnered with edX for the Middle School Scholarship Challenge. By participating in one of five specified edX massive open online courses (or MOOCs) this winter, applicants can secure a spot as one of 500 semifinalists in the competition.

White House Student Film Festival
The theme of the second-annual White House Student Film Festival is “The Impact of Giving Back”. The event is open to K-12 U.S. students to allow young people to share their voices, stories, and creativity on a national stage through original short films clocking in at three minutes or less. The deadline for submissions is February 2.

DC Water Summer Internship Program
Students who are currently enrolled full-time at an accredited college or university, have completed the first semester of their sophomore year, and have at least a 2.75 grade point average are eligible to apply for a 40-hour per week internship with the District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority. The program will run from May 27 – August 7. Applications must be received by March 31.

DreamUP! Career Exploration Program
The program sponsored by the Office Depot Foundation enables middle school students to evaluate their career interests and future career goals. Winning students will each spend one day shadowing a mentor in the field of his/ her chosen dream career. U.S. residents who are full-time students of a public or private middle school in the 50 U.S. states and District of Columbia (excluding Puerto Rico) are eligible to apply. Applications must be received by February 5.

Virginia Forum on Tobacco Use Call for Posters
A special Student Poster Award competition is open to all undergraduate and graduate students. Posters will be reviewed to ensure they address a topic related to etiology and /or prevention of tobacco use. There will be two awards of $200 each. For additional information, contact Dr. Randy Koch (804.828.8633).

National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Awards
The awards sponsored by the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities recognize excellence in afterschool and out-of-school arts and humanities programs for underserved children and youth. These programs offer high-quality and intensive instruction on weekends, afternoons, and summer vacations. Twelve winners will receive a $10,000 award and an invitation to accept their award at a White House ceremony. Programs initiated by museums, libraries, performing arts organizations, schools and universities, arts centers, community service organizations, and government agencies are encouraged to apply. Eligible programs must have been in operation for a minimum of five years. The application deadline is February 2.

Out of the Box Prize
Created by the University of Kansas, the prize honors exemplary approaches to promoting community health and development in communities worldwide. A community group’s work may involve activities to improve community health, education, urban or rural development; to address poverty or the environment, or promote social justice. The grand prize is $5,000; the second place winner will receive $3,000. The deadline for applications is April 30.

Parents Empowered Educational Support Group
The weekly parent support group sponsored by the Family and Community Engagement (FACE) Center offers an opportunity for parents to share daily parenting frustrations and triumphs in a supportive environment as well as learn new strategies from each other to deal with these challenges.  No registration is required for the drop-in program; a light dinner and childcare services are provided. For more information, call the FACE Center at 703.824.6865.

AMA Foundation Minority Scholars Award Program Invites Applications
The AMA Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the American Medical Association, is committed to increasing the number of minority physicians to better reflect the needs of an increasingly diverse society. The Minority Scholars Award program offers approximately eight to thirteen medical student tuition assistance scholarships of $10,000. Eligible students must be from traditionally underrepresented groups in the medical profession, including African American/Black, American Indian, Native Hawaiian, Alaska Native, and Hispanic/Latino. In partnership with the Association of Black Cardiologists, the foundation also offers a $5,000 scholarship to a first- or second-year African-American medical student with an expressed interest in cardiology. The deadline for applications is March 6.

Generous U Competition
The objective of the national contest is to increase philanthropy and philanthropic values on college campuses in the United States. Student groups are invited to demonstrate a successful effort to engage a substantial number of their peers in charitable giving; increase philanthropic awareness and a culture of giving on their campuses; nurture the lifelong habit of charitable giving among their peers; and/or develop a philanthropic program model that can be replicated on other campuses. The competition will consider an organized activity intended to encourage charitable giving by students. Application materials are due March 13.

Allies in Prevention Awards
The Ally in Prevention Award recognizes individuals in Northern Virginia who have gone above and beyond in their efforts to prevent child abuse and neglect. One individual will be recognized from Alexandria, Arlington, Loudoun, Fairfax/Falls Church, and Prince William. Award winners will be announced in March 2015 at the Allies in Prevention Awards Luncheon. The deadline for nominations is February 9.

Salute to Women Award Call for Nominations
The Commission for Women celebrates outstanding women, men and youth who have made a significant impact on women and girls in Alexandria at its annual ceremony. Nominations  must be submitted no later than February 20.

Society of Pediatric Psychology Accepting Applications for Diversity Research Grants
The annual program highlights the importance of diversity in pediatric psychology research and clinical care. Grants of $5,000 will be awarded to society members to conduct pediatric psychology research that features diversity-related variables such as race/ethnicity, gender, culture, sexual orientation, language differences, socioeconomic status, and/or religiosity. Other aspects of diversity may be considered. Applicants must be a member of the Society of Pediatric Psychology in good standing, and may be students, fellows or early career faculty. Proposals must be submitted by October 1.

American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Accepting Application for Pilot Research Awards
The annual program provides up to nine grants of $15,000 each to general psychiatry residents who have an interest in beginning a career in child and adolescent mental health research. The program supports young investigators conducting pilot research programs in order to encourage future careers in child and adolescent psychiatry research. The award also includes the cost of attending the annual meeting in New York City for five days. Applicants must either be a member of the academy or have a membership application pending. The deadline for applications is March 16.

‘Shark Tank’ Competition for Innovative Epilepsy Products
The Epilepsy Foundation has announced its fourth annual epilepsy “Shark Tank” competition for innovative ideas in epilepsy and seizure treatment and care. Examples of novel ideas include a seizure-detection system with the capacity to provide early warnings to the patient or family; a treatment that stops a seizure from progressing; a system that helps patients manage their daily treatment; a device that prevents physical injury that patients may experience when in seizure; or an entirely new product concept with the promise to dramatically improve the lives of people with epilepsy. Selected finalists will receive international recognition and compete for grants totaling $200,000. Letters of Intent are due February 16.

Enhancing Life Project Seeking Letters of Intent for Scholarly Projects
A collaboration between the University of Chicago and Ruhr University Bochum aims to explore the widely unexamined dimension of human aspiration and social life. The project supports relevant scholarly research projects in the areas of religious thought, theology, and philosophy; philosophy of biology, science, and technology; social sciences; and communications and media studies. The initiative will support the research projects of fifteen advanced career scholars with awards of $100,000 each and the projects of twenty early career scholars with awards of $50,000 each. Letters of Intent are due no later than February 1. To be eligible, scholars must have a doctoral degree (or equivalent) and be affiliated with an accredited college of university (or another major public or private research institution).

SAPCA January Newsletter
The Department of Community and Human Services will be hosting Youth Mental Health First Aid courses in the coming months. Learn more in the January edition of Substance Abuse Prevention Coalition of Alexandria.

Grantsmanship

DCHS Office of Youth Services Listing of Grant Opportunities
The DCHS Office of Youth Services compiled a listing of grant opportunities on January 16.

Research & Resources

ACPS Sees Historic Rise in AP Exam Results, Participation
During the 2014-15 school year, the greatest number of Advanced Placement (AP) exams were taken by the greatest number of students ever recorded in the history of T.C. Williams High School. As a result of this achievement, ACPS has been placed on the College Board’s Fifth Annual AP District Honor Role for Significant Gains in Student Access and Success. ACPS is only one of six school districts in Virginia to earn this honor.

ACPS Adds 22 More Courses to Its Curriculum
The Alexandria City School Board approved adding 22 new courses to expand high school and middle school offerings for the 2015-16 academic year. Five are high school courses, one is an addition for middle school, and 16 are new online courses. In addition, the School Board approved adding honors courses for the 2016-17 school year.

School Board Approves Honor Code for All Secondary Students
The Alexandria City School Board approved an honor code for all ACPS secondary schools -- the first time any formal honor code has been adopted in the history of ACPS. Students at all ACPS middle and high schools will be required to sign the agreement, which bans plagiarism and cheating. They may also be required to sign the agreement again before major tests or essays. Any student who violates the code will receive a zero on the assignment with no chance of correction or retake.

Google Commits to Pledge on Student-Data Privacy
After initially declining to sign, the technology Giant has joined a growing number of companies committing to a “student-privacy pledge” launched by advocacy groups and endorsed by the White House. Google has come under heavy scrutiny for privacy practices that critics have feared would open the door to students’ personal information being used for advertising purposes.

Condoleezza Rice Tapped to Lead K-12 Advocacy Group Founded by Jeb Bush
Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice has been picked as the next leader of the Foundation for Excellence in Education, the influential advocacy organization founded by former Florida governor and potential presidential candidate Jeb Bush.

Bill to End A-F Accountability Before It Begins Advances in Virginia
Legislation to discard the A-F system was approved January 19 by a Virginia Senate subcommittee on a 3-2 vote. Last year, the legislature agreed to delay the start of giving schools letter grades until 2016. Republican Senator Richard Black said he introduced the bill because students at schools receiving F grades would be unfairly stigmatized, and such schools would find recruiting new teachers very difficult.

10 Tips for Setting Successful Goals With Students
A teacher shares concrete steps for creating action plans and action items with students.

Back to School: Exploring Promising Practices for Re-engaging Young People in Secondary Education
A paper by America’s Promise explores ways to strengthen and expand re-engagement options for young people who need more time or different pathways to finish school. It is designed as a resource for educators, practitioners, community stakeholders, communications professionals, and policymakers interested in supporting out-of-school youth who wish to obtain a high school credential.

Preparing to Launch: Early Childhood’s Academic Countdown
The 19th annual edition of Quality Counts takes a broad look at the issues and forces shaping the discussion around early-childhood education. It examines how new academic demands and the push for accountability are changing the nature of early-childhood education for school administrators, teachers, and children alike.

Early-Childhood Education in the U.S.: An Analysis
The Education Week Research Center analyzed American Community Survey data to identify patterns in the school enrollment of young children. Results indicate that preschool participation is heavily influenced by a range of socioeconomic factors, including household income, parental education levels, and race and ethnicity. The state where a child lives also has an impact.

Chronic Absenteeism Challenges D. C. Public Schools’ Preschool Program
According to research released by the Washington-based Urban Institute, about 1 in 4 preschoolers attending Title I schools in the District of Columbia missed 10% or more of 2013-14 school year. The children who missed the most preschool were the ones experts believe to be most in need of the boost that a high-quality early-childhood program provides – children with disabilities, homeless children, and children whose families were on welfare, for example.

Not Enrolled in Preschool: A State-by-State Breakdown
One-third of the 4.3 million 3- and 4-year olds who are not enrolled in school across the nation live in four large states: California, Florida, New York, and Texas. California accounts for the largest share, at more than 12%.

Hispanic Preschool Participation Varies by State
Hispanics are the nation’s largest minority group, comprising a quarter of all 3-and-4-year olds. They also have the lowest preschool participation rates on any major ethnicity or race in the United States, 39% as compared to about 50% for Asians, African-Americans, and whites. But that rate varies considerably by state.

New Measures Help Build Relationships Between Families and Early Care and Education Providers
It is an accepted fact that high-quality relationships between parents, childcare providers, and teachers can have a positive effect on parents, children and families in several ways. But there have been no tools for measuring the quality of these relationships. The Family and Provider/Teacher Relationship Quality (FPTRQ) project has identified five new measures to accomplish that.

Day-Care Providers to Partner with Head Start
The Obama administration wants the half-billion dollars in Early Head Start-Child Care Partnership Grants to boost the quality of child care available to infants and toddlers from low-income families by forging partnerships between small centers and family-day-care homes and Early Head Start (which serves infants, toddlers up to age 3, and pregnant women). But the benefits of federal funding come with substantial challenges for these small businesses. There are just 18 months from the time they receive their money until they must fully meet Head Start’s many standards.

Doctors Enlisted to Deliver Early-Literacy Message
The American Academy of Pediatrics has long recognized the importance of telling parents to talk to and read with their children. But it has only recently begun advising its doctors to deliver that message for the first time at a child’s two-month checkup. What has been less clear, and never studied systematically, is how to deliver that information in a way that sticks during the 12-18 minute visits physicians generally have with families for well-baby checkups. That’s where Too Small to Fail, a national campaign encouraging parents to talk, read and sing to their infants and toddlers as a key precursor to literacy.

Bus Brings Computers to Kids after School
A school bus in Mitchell County, Georgia has been outfitted with 24 computers, printers, a whiteboard and an overhead projector, providing youth and their parents in the rural, high-poverty county with an afterschool computer lab. During a test run in December, the bus went to seven locations with 400 students using it. Even more surprising was 300 high school parents also showed up.

Shaking the Money Tree: Sources for After-School Funding
In its latest Note of the Week (a free subscription from the otherwise for-profit ExtendED Notes), the company provides a list of potential afterschool funding sources.

Afterschool Programs for Low-Income Children Endangered by Proposed Senate Bill
A draft of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (a bill proposed in the U.S. Senate) proposes cutting programs funded by the 21st Century Community Learning Centers initiative that serve more than 1.66 million children. The bill would kill the program and shift the funding to local agencies for a wider variety of education purposes.

Majority of Public School Students Now Considered Low-Income
According to an analysis of federal data by the Southern Education Foundation, a majority of students in U.S. public schools are low-income – the first time in recent history. In 2013, 51% of public school students qualified for free and reduced-price lunch.

Does the ’30 Million-Word Gap’ Have Gap in Authenticity?
According to the Clinton Foundation, the word gap is too big to ignore and “too small to fail.” This gap – also known as “language gap” or “vocabulary gap” is based on an old research finding that children from “welfare” families were exposed to an average of 30 million fewer words than children from high-income families during the first four years. This has spurred large-scale university-led interventions such as the University of Chicago ‘Thirty Million Words Initiative”. Missing from Clinton’s pipeline-to-adult failure argument are institutional disadvantages that parents do not control, such as inequitable school funding, biases in standardized tests, and the effort spent to navigate life in poverty.

States’ Efforts to Close Achievement Gap Examined in New Report
A recent report from the Education Commission of the States, “Closing the Achievement Gap: Four States’ Efforts,” examines how Connecticut, Massachusetts, Washington, and Wisconsin have tried to shrink the separation between wealthy and privileged students and the rest.

Schools Help Close Racial Gaps in Arts Education
New studies by the National Endowment of the Arts suggest schools play a critical role in providing students of color access to music, drama, and other arts classes.

YouTube Series Turn Classic Literature into Modern Video Blogs
A recent trend in online storytelling may offer opportunities for teachers looking to help connect students to literature: Literary YouTube series seek to transform classic works into video blogs set in the modern day.

Teacher Licensing Program for Veterans Working
Governor Terry Branstad of Iowa is touting the success of a teacher licensing program aimed at helping veterans and their families.

Owning Pets Has Pros and Cons for Homeless Youth
Researchers wanted to know whether owning a pet significantly affected homeless young people’s mental health symptoms, their use of services, and their ability to find and keep housing. Based on the results of their study, the authors feel that youth and family service providers should acknowledge the importance of pets for the safety and emotional well-being of homeless youth.

Many Former Foster Youth Unaware of New Health Care Benefits
Young adults in every state who have aged out of the foster care system are now eligible for Medicaid under a new provision of the Affordable Care Act. Analysts believe that anywhere from 5,000 to 10,000 young people who have aged out of foster care in New York are eligible, but have yet to be connected to coverage.

Helping Youth and Families Get Affordable Care Act Health Coverage
The Family & Youth Services Bureau has made available an overview of resources regarding health coverage under the Affordable Care Act.

Young Family Caregivers Face Many Struggles, Get Little Support
At least 1.3 million American children between the ages of 8 and 18 are enlisted to care for elderly, ill and disabled family members, according to a 2005 survey that is the only one of its kind in the U.S. But experts think the numbers are much higher and growing, as the proportions of Americans over age 65 and living with chronic health conditions climbs. For many of these children, their duties add up to a part-time job that can interfere with the business of growing up. A recent survey of Florida middle school students, presented in October at the American Academy of Pediatrics conference, found that youth caregivers spend an estimated 12 to 20 hours a week in that role. These children face an increased risk of anxiety, depression, substance abuse and school failure.

Girls with Same-Sex Partners More Likely to Report Relationship Abuse
Researchers wanted to examine relationship abuse and sexual and reproductive health among girls and young women who engage in same-sex behaviors, whether or not they identify as lesbian or bisexual. Relationship abuse was defined as physical, sexual, and psychological abuse or harassment in romantic or intimate relationships. Compared to girls and young women who only had male partners, those who had same-sex partners were more likely to come to a clinic for sexually transmitted infection testing or treatment, and more likely to report recent relationship abuse.

Cyber-Bullying Happens Less Often than In-Person Bullying
Researchers found that youth were twice as likely to bully or be bullied in traditional settings compared to digital spaces. Across the 80 studies the researchers looked at, an average of 35% of youth had been bullied in person. An average of 15% of youth had been bullied online or via mobile devices. This pattern was consistent within and across studies, the authors say, with most studies reporting higher offline than online rates.

Bullying and Suicidal Ideation and Behaviors: A Meta-Analysis
Researchers conducted a meta-analysis to estimate the association between bullying involvement and suicidal ideation and behaviors. Findings demonstrated that involvement in bullying in any capacity is associated with suicidal ideation and behavior. Future research should address mental health implications of bullying involvement to prevent suicidal ideation/behavior.

Broader Picture of International Education Progress Unveiled in Study
A new report by the Horace Mann League of the U.S.A. and the National Superintendents Roundtable entitled “The Iceberg Effect” seeks to put student achievement and long-term educational outcomes within the broader social and economic context of different countries. Researchers concluded the United States ranks last among nine industrialized nations on the levels of violence and cultural stress that students encounter.

Maryland Grooms Assistant Principals to Take Schools’ Top Jobs
Through the Governor’s Promising Principals Academy, officials will train nearly 48 assistant principals this academic year, selecting two of the best and brightest from each of the state’s 24 districts.

Workshops & Webinars

Mediation: Preparing for a Difficult Conversation – Part 1 (On-Demand)
The webinar is designed to provide the working knowledge needed to prepare for a face-to-face conversation in order to maximize the chances for a helpful and productive meeting.

 

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