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Youth Topics is a service of the Center for Children and Families, Department of Community and Human Services, City of Alexandria.  It is produced by Jacqueline Coachman, DCHS Office of Youth Services. 

Subscribe here. Make inquiries here. Youth Topics is posted online here. 

 

In the July 14 Edition: 

Events
Outdoor Day (July 16)
Ratcliff Thomas Foundation Youth Football Camp (July 18)
Journey to the Jungle (July 19)
National Juvenile Justice Network Anniversary Forum (July 20-21)
Superhero Lego Event (July 21)
Magician, Joe Romano (July 21)
Preventing Violence: Evidence-Based Programs and Policies to Promote Positive Youth Development (July 22)
Japan in a Suitcase (July 23)
Coalition for Juvenile Justice Youth Forum (July 23-24)
Launch of Youth Voice Alexandria Website (July 28)
Juggling Funny Stories with Chris Fascione (July 28)
Brain Science Night – Cells (July 28)
Mad Science ABCs (July 29)
ACAP and SAPCA Youth Leadership Conference (August 17-19)
Best Practices in Truancy Prevention and Reduction (September 21)
Impact: Innovation + Philanthropy (October 6)
Equity Summit 2015 (October 27-29)
Global Youth Justice Training Institute (December 1-3)

Careers/Volunteerism 
Parent Leadership Training Institute Recruiting Class of 2016
SAPCA Seeking Youth Members for Board
Waste Water Systems Technician Apprentice
American Association on Health and Disability Scholarships
Youth Action Council on Transition
Youth Innovation and Entrepreneurship Awards
Law Scholarship for Child Advocates
Global Mental Health Fellowship
Scholarships to Attend Independent Sector National Conference
Human Rights Essay Award
International Affairs Fellowships
Russian Fellowship Program
Young Investigator Program
Tribeca Film Institute Documentary Fund
ACAP Newsletter
Volunteer Times

Grantsmanship
DCHS Office of Youth Services Listing of Grant Opportunities

Research & Resources 
Children’s Budget 2015
Still Losing Ground: Children’s Budget 2015
Saudi Prince Alwaleed Pledges $32 Billion Fortune to Charity

Education
Superintendent Crawley Names New Principal at Ramsay Elementary School
Legislation Would Keep Foster Kids from Having to Change Schools
Obama Administration: Education Bills Lack Accountability
Democrats Aim to Expand Access for Pre-K During Senate ESEA Debate
Senate ESEA Debate: What to Expect This Week
Funding for After-School Programs at Risk in Congress, Groups Say
NEA To Support Opt-Out, Oppose Common-Core Testing
NEA Takes Stand on Institutional Racism
Resolution on Confederate Flag Sparks Controversy at NEA Assembly
Student Fights, Fear of Harm at School Have Declined, Newest Federal Data Show
Schools Could See Fewer Unaccompanied Minors This Fall
Spanish-Language Spelling Bees Catch on Around the U.S.
Philadelphia District Announces $30M Commitment for Literacy Programs
Vending Machines in Anacostia Provide Free Children’s Books
Wisconsin Law Requires ID of Schools that Send Unprepared Students to College
Minnesota High School Screens Students for ACEs to Develop Trauma-informed Education
Body Cameras Making Their Way in Iowa Schools
Amid New Reports of Atlanta Schools Cheating, Superintendent Calls for Change

Youth Well-Being
Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health Resources and Services: A Guide for Early Education and Care Professionals
“Helping Kids Recover and Thrive” Campaign
Updated Teen Depression Brochure
Boys More Likely to Have Anti-Psychotics Prescribed, Regardless of Age
New Report Shows Increase in Reported Adverse Health Effects from Synthetic Cannabinoid Use
Young People in Recovery Need Anonymity More than Ever, Experts Say
Zeroing In on Place and Race: Youth Disconnection in America’s Cities
Campaign Call for Hotels to Stand Up Against Child Trafficking
The Sexual Abuse to Prison Pipeline: The Girls’ Story
Runaway and Cast Off: One LGBT Teen’s Story
6 Questions to Identify Youth at highest Risk of Long-term Homelessness
Amendment to Federal Strategic Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness Released
Advice From a Former Foster Youth
Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative
Focus on Fathers
Exploring the Worlds of Adolescent Fathers
We All Believe in Children: How Faith Groups and Human Service Organizations Can Connect, and Why We Need to Make it Happen
“Doing Hair” and Literacy in an Afterschool Reading and Writing Workshop for African-American Adolescent Girls
Many Versions of Masculine: An Exploration of Boys’ Identity Formation through Digital Storytelling in an Afterschool Program
Build Linguistic and Cultural Competence in Your Program

Juvenile Justice
Annie E. Casey Foundation CEO Calls for States to Close “Youth Prisons”
Re-Examining Juvenile Incarceration – High Cost, Poor Outcomes Spark Shift to Alternatives
‘Terrible Racial Disparities’ Not Fixed With SD Juvenile Justice Reform
OJJDP Updates National DMS Data to Statistical Briefing Book

Workshops & Webinars 
Act Now Series: Governance, Leadership and Building a Strategic Board (July 15)
“Adult Ally” What Does it Mean to Parents? (July 16)
Recovery and Supports for Women Involved with the Criminal Justice System (July 23)
Act Now Series: Customer Centered Design (July 29)
Embedding Youth Development in Schools: A Thought Leader Conversation (July 31)
Emerging Legal Issues with Technology (July 31)
Measuring Outcomes for the Next Generation of Healthy Marriage and Relationship Education Programs (On Demand)

Events

Outdoor Day (July 16)
Bubble toys, sidewalk chalk, a pond full of boats to sail and more will be available on the lawn of the Barrett Branch Library (717 Queen St.) starting at 11 a.m. The event is recommended for ages 2 and up. In case of inclement weather, there will be a film showing inside the library.  

Ratcliff Thomas Foundation Youth Football Camp (July 18)
The camp from 11 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. at Bailey’s Community Center (5920 Summers Lane, Falls Church) will feature former T.C. Williams High School, University of Maryland, and Indianapolis Colts star Ratcliff Thomas. Players will develop and improve their football skills while learning proper techniques of “Heads Up” Football stance, blocking, tackling, catching and agility. Free for all youth, it is for ages 8-16. Contact Greg Williams, Director (703.931.7027) or Ratcliff Thomas for additional information.

Journey to the Jungle (July 19)
Traveling Zoo Wildlife Ambassadors will teach about the beautiful birds that live in tropical rain forests. The show featuring live animals starts at 2 p.m. at Beatley Central Library (5005 Duke St.). All ages are welcome and no registration is required, but early arrival is advised as space is limited.  

National Juvenile Justice Network Anniversary Forum (July 20-21)
The forum will bring advocates for youth justice reform for training, networking, and strategy-sharing together in Washington, D.C.  

Superhero Lego Event (July 21)
Brixalot will be at Barrett Branch Library (717 Queen St.) from 2 – 5 p.m. with a supersize collection of Legos (recommended for ages 5 and up) and Duplos (recommended for ages 2 and up) with a superhero theme. MegaBlox will be available for the youngest patrons.  

Magician, Joe Romano (July 21)
Magic and laughs will be available at the Burke Branch Library (4701 Seminary Road) at 6 p.m. The event is for ages 6-12 only.  

Preventing Violence: Evidence-Based Programs and Policies to Promote Positive Youth Development (July 22)
Senior Scholar Kristin Anderson Moore will join the National Prevention Science Coalition to Improve Lives for their congressional briefing on violence prevention and positive youth development. The presentation from 1-3:30 p.m. will focus on factors that increase propensity for youth violence, based on Child Trends research. Speakers will also review strategies for reducing violence, and co-sponsor Rep. Robert C. "Bobby" Scott will present on bipartisan prevention-related legislation. The event will take place at the Rayburn House Office Building, Room 2237.  

Japan in a Suitcase (July 23)
A program presented by the Japan-American Society of Washington, D.C. promotes understanding of Japan and Japanese culture to children through hands-on activities, games and demonstrations. The event is for ages 6-12 and will begin at 3:30 p.m. at the Duncan Branch Library (2501 Commonwealth Ave.).  

Coalition for Juvenile Justice Youth Forum (July 23-24)
The Coalition for Juvenile Justice and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention are co-hosting the Juvenile Justice Youth Summit at the 20 F Street Conference Center in Washington. D.C. The event brings together emerging leaders ages 17-25 interested in juvenile justice reform.  

Launch of Youth Voice Alexandria Website (July 28)
A webinar will acquaint participants with Youth Voice Alexandria as well as its new youth-friendly website developed by youth. For more information or technical assistance, contact Jeremy Long (703.746.3142).        

Juggling Funny Stories with Chris Fascione (July 28)
Nationally-known family entertainer Chris Fascione brings children’s stories to life with his high-spirited and innovative performance. The event for ages 5-12 at the Mount Vernon Recreation Center (2701 Commonwealth Ave.) begins at 3:30.   

Brain Science Night – Cells (July 28)
Youth ages 8-12 will learn about brain cells from neuroscientists from the University of Maryland’s Developmental Social Cognitive Neuroscience Lab and make a fun brain craft. The fun begins at 7 p.m. at Beatley Central Library (5005 Duke St.).   

Mad Science ABCs (July 29)
Youth ages 3-5 with an adult will learn the science behind magic and explore the chemistry of slime and Styrofoam. The show will take place at 2 p.m. at the Burke Branch Library (4701 Seminary Rd).

ACAP and SAPCA Youth Leadership Conference (August 17-19)
ACAP and SAPCA will be hosting the fourth annual Youth Leadership Conference from 10am-5pm at the First Baptist Church (2932 King Street). The conference is free for high-school aged youth (including rising ninth graders) and will include snacks and lunch each day. Youth who attend the conference will have the opportunity to expand their leadership skills, learn about financial literacy, and practice networking. Register online, email the registration form to Lisette Torres, or mail it to ACAP (421 King Street, Suite 400, Alexandria, VA 22314.  

Best Practices in Truancy Prevention and Reduction (September 21)
The training in Denver by the National Center for School Engagement will focus on best practices for schools and communities seeking to launch or expand school attendance efforts.  

Impact: Innovation + Philanthropy (October 6)
The annual event of Act for Alexandria will feature Paul Schmitz, groundbreaking author and innovator, as the keynote speaker. Registration is $25 for individuals and $100 for groups of five until September 4. Rates increase to $40 for individuals and $175 for groups on September 5.  

Equity Summit 2015 (October 27-29)
The conference in Los Angeles will ground inclusion, justice, and prosperity in the urgent issues of today and connect them to the creativity and bold vision of the equity movement. Come prepared to engage with others to develop plans to advance an equity-driven agenda for city councils, state legislatures, Congress, and the next President.  

Global Youth Justice Training Institute (December 1-3)
On December 1–3, 2015, Global Youth Justice, in collaboration with the National African American Drug Policy Coalition, will host its 12th Global Youth Justice Training Institute in Las Vegas, NV. Participants will learn strategies to establish or enhance local youth justice diversion programs through teen, student, youth, and peer courts and juries. Topics will include training youth and adult volunteers; providing quality community services, programs, and referrals; conducting mock family intake meetings, grant writing, funding opportunities, and more. 

Careers/Volunteerism 

Parent Leadership Training Institute Recruiting Class of 2016
The objective of the Parent Leadership Training Institute (PLTI) is to enable parents to become leading advocates for children. In its tenth year, PLTI is recruiting candidates for the Class of 2016.

SAPCA Seeking Youth Members for Board
The Substance Abuse Prevention Coalition of Alexandria (SAPCA) has two vacant seats for youth members on its board. Members will start serving in September. Applications are due August 21 and should be forwarded to Noraine Buttar (703.746.3670). Learn more in the latest edition of the SAPCA newsletter.     

Waste Water Systems Technician Apprenticeship Program
Successful completion of the two-year program can lead to the Virginia Class 3 Wastewater Works Operator License within two and a half years of entering the program. After completion of the license process, apprentices are responsible for operating and maintaining a waste water treatment plant and onsite sewage system. To apply, email resume to Dawn Luczak or fax to 703.997.8666.

American Association on Health and Disability Scholarships
The scholarships support students with disabilities pursuing higher education. Preference is given to students who plan to pursue undergraduate/graduate studies in the field of public health, health promotion, and disability studies. Applicants must be enrolled full-time as an undergraduate and have a documented disability. Scholarships will be limited to under $1,000 and will be awarded in January 2016. The deadline for applications is November 15.  

Youth Action Council on Transition 
The Youth Action Council on Transition (YouthACT) is a national initiative to get more youth with disabilities and their allies involved as leaders who partner with adults and organizations to improve opportunities for youth to succeed in life. YouthACT is open to youth with disabilities or chronic health conditions and youth who are allies of the disability community between the ages of 12 and 25 who are interested in partnering with adults and organizations to improve the transition process for youth in their communities. Applications will be accepted until July 31.

Youth Innovation and Entrepreneurship Awards
An initiative of UN-Habitat and the International Ecological Safety Collaboration Organization, the awards acknowledge and recognize initiatives that will create positive impact socially, economically, and environmentally. Awards will be given in the following categories: Youth Leadership, Green Inventions and Innovations, Urban Ecological Safety, Youth Entrepreneurship, and Social and Cultural Innovations. Individual cash grants of $20,000 will be given to two winners in each category. Awards will be granted to outstanding inventors, innovators, and entrepreneurs from all corners of the globe. Applications for organizations/projects as well as nominations for individuals (including self-nominations) are accepted. The deadline for receipt of entries is July 31.

Law Scholarship for Child Advocates
The law firm of  Steinger, Iscoe & Greene dedicates a large part of its practice to helping families who have faced child abuse in any form. The firm believes that attorneys are in a unique position to be able to help families and individual victims of child abuse. While the damage that abuse causes can be life-long, a dedicated lawyer can help end the abuse, establish legal protections for victims, win custody battles, and even secure compensation to provide medical treatment and therapy. To that end, twice a year the firm awards a scholarship of $1,000 toward law school tuition. Applications for a fall semester scholarship must be received by July 31. Spring semester applications must be received by November 30.

Global Mental Health Fellowship
The annual program of the American Psychological Association provides a psychologist with the opportunity to spend a year in the Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse at the World Health Organization in Geneva working on one or more issues related to the WHO Mental Health Action Plan. The program is designed to provide psychologists with exposure to and involvement with international global mental health policy and implementation; contribute to the more effective use of psychological knowledge and research in global mental health policy and implementation; and broaden awareness about the value of socio-behavioral approaches to health and mental health in a global context. Funding for the fellowship will provide supplemental funds of $30,000 for living expenses in Geneva and fellowship-related travel. No salary funds are provided. The deadline to apply is September 30.  

Scholarships to Attend Independent Sector National Conference
The Bush Foundation is inviting applications for scholarships to attend an annual conference where leading professionals from nonprofits, foundations, and corporations of every size come together to collaborate, network, and learn about emerging national and global trends. Each scholarship will cover registration, hotel costs, and reimbursement of travel expenses. The deadline is August 1.

Human Rights Essay Award
The Academy of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law at American University’s Washington College of Law is accepting entries for an annual award program that seeks to stimulate the production of scholarly work in international human rights law. The topic for the 2016 competition is Extractive Industries and Human Rights. The academy will grant two awards – one for the best article in English and one for the best article in Spanish. Each award is comprised of a scholarship to the Program of Advanced Studies in Human Rights and Humanitarian Law for either the diploma or certificate of attendance; travel expenses to Washington, D.C.; housing at a university dorm, and a per diem for living expenses. Applications must be received by February 1.  

International Affairs Fellowships
The annual program of the Council of Foreign Relations (CFR) provides fellows with the opportunity to broaden their perspective of foreign affairs and pursue proposed research with a placement at either CFR or another institution in New York City or Washington, D.C. There are two fellowship tracks: International Affairs Fellowship and the International Affairs Fellowship in Japan. The program awards a stipend, which varies with each fellowship. The deadline is October 31.  

Russian Fellowship Program
Up to eighteen accomplished young American, Britons, and Germans will be afforded the opportunity to complete a high-level professional development program in Russia. The fellowship provides a monthly stipend, accommodation, insurance, all program-related travel costs, language training in Russia, and private tutoring in the U.S., UK, or Germany. The deadline is December 1.  

Young Investigator Program
The program of the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation provides research support to the most promising young faculty members in the early stages of their academic career in the chemical and life sciences, with the purpose of fostering their ability to invent methods, instruments, and materials that open up new avenues of research in science. The program is open to individual researchers within the first three years of a tenure-track position, or an equivalent independent research appointment, in an academic or nonprofit institution that conduct research in the chemical and life sciences. Projects are normally funded for a period of four years. Grants will range up to $750,000 over the term of the project, contingent on demonstrated progress after the second year of the award. Letters of Intent must be received no later than September 2.  

Tribeca Film Institute Documentary Fund
Through its Documentary Fund, the Tribeca Film Institute provides grants and guidance to exceptional filmmakers with character-driven nonfiction works-in-progress that sit outside the social issue landscape. The program is open to filmmakers anywhere in the world, 18 years of age or older. Grants of up to $50,000 will be awarded. The deadline for submissions is August 3.  

ACAP Newsletter
The U.S. teen birth rate “has hit a new record low,” decreasing 9% in 2014. Read more in the new and improved newsletter of the Alexandria Campaign on Adolescent Pregnancy (ACAP).  

Volunteer Times
Interested in becoming a disaster volunteer? Volunteer Alexandria’s monthly orientation for new disaster volunteers is scheduled for July 25 from 9:30 a.m. – 11:30 p.m. See the latest edition of Volunteer Times to register.

Grantsmanship

DCHS Office of Youth Services Listing of Grant Opportunities
The DCHS Office of Youth Services compiled a listing of grant opportunities on July 2 and July 13.

Research & Resources

Children’s Budget 2015
Since 2010, the share of federal discretionary spending dedicated to children has dropped by more than 7% in just four years -- down from a high of 8.5% in 2010. Children’s Budget 2015 offers a detailed guide to federal spending on children.

Still Losing Ground: Children’s Budget 2015
Patrick Boyle, communications director for the Forum for Youth Development and a veteran journalist on youth issues, provides an in-depth look at the implications of Children’s Budget 2015 and shares ways to use the report for advocacy.  In response to those who state everyone took a hit during the recession and the consequent cuts in federal spending, he noted the comments of Bruce Lesley, the president of First Focus: “Kids are disproportionately taking the brunt of those cuts”.  

Saudi Prince Alwaleed Pledges $32 Billion Fortune to Charity
With the aim of building a “better world of tolerance, acceptance, equality and opportunity for all”, Alwaleed announced he would begin transferring his entire fortune to Alwaleed Philanthropies, to which he has already donated 3.5 billion in support of charitable projects. He said the “commitment is without boundaries”. The foundation works to promote more sustainable communities, empower women and youth, assist the survivors of disaster, and create a more tolerant and accepting world. A major shareholder in Twitter, Alwaweed said his pledge was inspired in part by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Education
Superintendent Crawley Names New Principal at Ramsay Elementary School
Michael J. Routhouska has been selected as the new principal of William Ramsay Elementary School. Routhouska has been the assistant principal of Patrick Henry Elementary School for the past three years. He served as assistant principal at Ramsay from 2011-12.  

Legislation Would Keep Foster Kids from Having to Change Schools
The traumatic changes children in foster care face often include disrupted schooling. They may have to change schools when they first enter foster care, then shift from school to school with each new foster home. A study found 65% of foster kids in Washington and Oregon went to seven or more school from elementary to high school. A bill introduced in the U.S. Senate in mid-June would require school districts and child welfare agencies to work together to keep youth in their original school when it is in their best interest.  

Obama Administration: Education Bills Lack Accountability
The Obama administration announced it cannot support either the Senate or the House versions of bills being considered to update the No Child Left Behind education law because neither bill has sufficient accountability to ensure all children get the resources they need to succeed.  

Democrats Aim to Expand Access for Pre-K During Senate ESEA Debate
Senator Bob Casey, D-Pa., plans to offer an amendment that would create a five-year, federal-state partnership to expand and improve early-learning opportunities for children from birth to age 5 when the U.S. Senate begins debating a bipartisan rewrite of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA).  

Senate ESEA Debate: What to Expect This Week
When the U.S. Senate convenes to continue considering its overhaul of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, it will begin with a pair of largely pre-agreed upon amendments but quickly move to more contentious debates at the heart of the reauthorization—proposals to increase accountability, give students and parents more school choice options, and prevent bullying, among others.  

Funding for After-School Programs at Risk in Congress, Groups Say
Millions of dollars for afterschool and other youth programs appear at risk, worrying such groups as the Afterschool Alliance and the Forum for Youth Investment.  

NEA To Support Opt-Out, Oppose Common-Core Testing
At this year’s convention of the National Education Association, delegates voted down NBI 5, which would have supported the opt-out movement and concomitant legislation. Then they approved NBI 115, which will require the union to support opt-out and test refusal through the union’s current infrastructure.  

NEA Takes Stand on Institutional Racism
Delegates passed an item directing the union to do more to combat institutional racism. It calls on the union to provide technical assistance to affiliates to develop “plans of action”; partner on campaigns to fight against racism and “redirect” resources to support affiliate projects to develop community schools; end the “school to prison pipeline,” and support professional development in cultural competence and social justice. The item carries a $277,000 price tag.  

Resolution on Confederate Flag Sparks Controversy at NEA Assembly
Less than 24 hours after NEA delegates took a stand on institutional racism, they debated for 90 minutes a new business item directing the union to “find appropriate and effective efforts to remove the confederate battle flag from schools and public spaces”.  The item ultimately passed overwhelmingly by a voice vote.

Student Fights, Fear of Harm at School Have Declined, Newest Federal Data Show
According to various federal sources included in the annual Indicators of School Crime and Safety report, fewer high school students reported being in physical fights on school grounds, fewer teens reported victimization at school, and fewer students reported carrying weapons at school. In addition, the percentage of students who reported being “afraid of attack or harm at school or on the way to and from school” dropped from 12% in 1995 to 3% in 2013. Other topics covered in the report include teacher injuries, bullying and cyberbullying, school conditions, and availability and student use of drugs and alcohol.   

Schools Could See Fewer Unaccompanied Minors This Fall
The number of unaccompanied school-age children from Central America arriving at the southern border of the United States has declined significantly from this time last year. The decline follows a surge in 2014 during which tens of thousands of children from Honduras, Guatemala, El Salvador, and Mexico sought to enter the United States along the country’s southern border. During the 2014 fiscal year, the Department of Homeland Security referred 57,496 children to the agency within the Department of Health and Human Services that cares for children once they are apprehended at the border. Fewer than 18,000 unaccompanied children were referred during the first eight months of FY 2015.  

Spanish-Language Spelling Bees Catch on Around the U.S.
The fifth annual National Spanish Spelling Bee will feature a mix of young spellers, including some native Spanish speakers and several who are not. Nationwide, local and regional Spanish-language spelling bees are happening in at least ten states.  

Philadelphia District Announces $30M Commitment for Literacy Programs
The commitments come from Philadelphia-based philanthropies, the William Penn Foundation (which pledged $6 million), and the Lensfest Foundation (which pledged another $4.5 million) to a three-year effort focused on improving early literacy. The rest of the $30 million will come from in-kind contributions and resources from the district over the next three years.  

Vending Machines in Anacostia Provide Free Children’s Books
JetBlue airlines has launched a pilot program in Anacostia will provide about 100,000 books this summer to children up to 14 years old. A selection of 12 books will rotate every two weeks, offering up to 42 different titles through the summer. Books will be distributed via vending machines located at the Salvation Army’s community center, the Safeway on Alabama Avenue, and near the entrance of Matthews Memorial Baptist Church on Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue.  

Wisconsin Law Requires ID of Schools that Send Unprepared Students to College
A new law in Wisconsin requires the state to examine high schools that send to its public universities more than six students who do not quality for credit-bearing coursework. It requires the University of Wisconsin to create a report that informs the state legislature and state department of education which high schools send more than a half-dozen students who must take remedial math or English courses.  

Minnesota High School Screens Students for ACEs to Develop Trauma-informed Education
At Paladin Career and Technical High School outside Minneapolis, 34% of the students are homeless. According to its Executive Director, “It’s not about tutoring, it’s about how to help students focus on education.” Graduation rates are up over 30%. The number of students planning to attend a two or four-year college increased from 16% to 84% in three years. Suspensions are rare, due to the restorative justice program. In the last three years, there have been only three expulsions.  

Body Cameras Making Their Way in Iowa Schools
Burlington Community School District in southeastern Iowa is taking the unusual step of recording parent and student interactions with administrators – a move district officials say will protect both sides.  

Amid New Reports of Atlanta Schools Cheating, Superintendent Calls for Change
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution has reported multiple cases of possible improper grading practices in recent months, “including cases of principals pressured to alter grades; retaliation against those who balked; and supervisors allegedly ignoring or implicitly approving the signs of cheating”. In response, the Superintendent of Atlanta schools said the district may be dealing with a deep-rooted problem.

Youth Well-Being
Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health Resources and Services: A Guide for Early Education and Care Professionals
Early childhood professionals play important roles in the lives of the young children they care for, and their knowledge and experience make them trusted resources for families. The guide provides basic information on infant and early childhood mental health, and includes descriptions of services and supports for families with young children as well as resources that can benefit both center-based and family providers of early education and care. To engage families in conversations about their children’s social and emotional development, the guide has advice on how to share concerns with parents. Also included is a discussion of self-care and suggestions on how programs can support their staff.  

“Helping Kids Recover and Thrive” Campaign
Raising awareness about the impact of child traumatic stress and what parents and caregivers can do to help children recover and thrive is the focus of a new public education campaign launched by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its National Child Traumatic Stress Initiative (NCTSI). The campaign, titled “Helping Kids Recover and Thrive” includes new public service announcements (PSAs) in English and Spanish, as well as a website. Forty-one percent of children and youth experienced a physical assault in the last year, and 1 in 10 experienced an assault-related injury. More than 1 in 10 experienced maltreatment by a caregiver. According to the landmark Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study, adverse childhood experiences increase the likelihood of adult strokes, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer, early death – and lowered job performance and employment levels. Over half of the more than 17,000 participants in the study had been exposed to at least one adverse childhood experience such as abuse, neglect, and household dysfunction.  Adults who had six or more adverse experiences were likely to die 20 years sooner than those with none.

Updated Teen Depression Brochure
The National Institute of mental health has updated its brochure on teen depression.  

Boys More Likely to Have Anti-Psychotics Prescribed, Regardless of Age
Boys are more likely than girls to receive a prescription for antipsychotic medication regardless of age, researchers have found. Approximately 1.5% of boys ages 10-18 received an antipsychotic prescription in 2010, although the percentage falls by nearly half after age 19. Among antipsychotic users with mental disorder diagnoses, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was the most common among youth ages 1-18, while depression was the most common diagnosis among young adults ages 19-24 receiving antipsychotics.   

New Report Shows Increase in Reported Adverse Health Effects from Synthetic Cannabinoid Use
Between January and May 2015, U.S. poison centers in 48 states reported receiving 3,572 calls related to synthetic cannabinoid use, a 229% increase from the 1,085 calls received during the same January through May period in 2014. The 2015 figures included a spike of 1,501 calls in April and 15 reported deaths, a three-fold increase over the five deaths that were reported in 2014. A new report from the Centers for disease Control discusses the increase as well as the adverse health effects associated with the use of synthetic cannabinoids.   

Young People in Recovery Need Anonymity More than Ever, Experts Say
While anonymity provides a safe environment for people recovering from addiction, it is increasingly difficult in a world dominated by social media. Some question whether anonymity makes sense in 2015.  

Zeroing In on Place and Race: Youth Disconnection in America’s Cities
Zeroing In on Place and Race is an in-depth look at how disconnected youth are faring in America’s cities, with data included on disconnected youth by state, congressional district, county, gender, and by race and ethnicity. Disconnected youth are teenagers and young adults between the ages of 16 and 24 who are neither working nor in school. There are 5,527,000 disconnected youth in America today, or one in seven young adults (13.8%)—about as many people as live in Minnesota. The national disconnected youth population is larger than the populations of thirty US states. The rate of youth disconnection has fallen since the Great Recession. Roughly 280,000 fewer young people are disconnected today than in 2010, the peak year for youth disconnection during the last decade. Beneath the national rate of 13.8%, however, lies staggering variation. Of the ninety-eight major metro areas included in this report—home to two in three Americans— disconnection rates range from under 8 percent in the Omaha, Nebraska, and Bridgeport, Connecticut metro areas to over 20% in greater Lakeland, Florida; Bakersfield, California; and Memphis, Tennessee.

Campaign Call for Hotels to Stand Up Against Child Trafficking
According to ECPAT-USA (a nonprofit that works to end commercial sexual exploitation of children) roughly 100,000 youth are victims of sex trafficking in the United States. The organization has launched a campaign to get hotels to set policies against child prostitution as well as educate travelers and hotels to recognize the signs of child trafficking. ECPAT-USA also has a checklist of practices hotels can use to identify and combat child exploitation.  

The Sexual Abuse to Prison Pipeline: The Girls’ Story
The powerful narrative of the “School to Prison Pipeline” exposes the ways boys of color are routinely criminalized and trapped in a cycle that prevents them from leading successful lives. Often lost in the conversation is a parallel sexual abuse to prison pipeline for girls. For girls, entry into the juvenile justice system is intertwined with experiences of abuse — especially sexual abuse — that are criminalized. The purpose of the report is to define and describe the sexual abuse to prison pipeline, reveal its underlying causes, and provide guidance to policymakers for reforms that would help shut it down forever. The pipeline into juvenile justice strikes girls of color especially hard. Youth of color account for 45% of the general youth population, but girls of color – who are approximately half of all youth of color – comprise approximately two-thirds of girls who are incarcerated.  

Runaway and Cast Off: One LGBT Teen’s Story
Almost 20,000 children were reported missing in New York State last year, and nearly all of them (96%) are suspected runaways like Ivan Cabrera. When Cabrera was 12, he watched his boyfriend Harry jump to his death in front of a train after they both came out as gay at their school. His mother looked at him, stunned, and then cursed at him. She cried and yelled, and told her son not to touch her because he would spread a virus.  

6 Questions to Identify Youth at highest Risk of Long-term Homelessness
The Transition Age Youth, or TAY, triage tool is a new questionnaire developed by an associate professor at the University of Southern California School of Social Work. The tool is used to assess six experiences determined to be strongly linked to long-term homelessness. Young people who score a four, five, or six on the questionnaire are considered to be most at-risk of staying homeless.  

Amendment to Federal Strategic Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness Released
A new amendment to Opening Doors, the federal strategic plan to prevent and end homelessness, includes a definition of what it means to end homelessness and updates to the strategies for preventing and ending homelessness for families, youth, and children in 2020. An end to homelessness, the amended plan says, "means that every community will have a systematic response in place that ensures homelessness is prevented whenever possible or is otherwise a rare, brief, and non-recurring experience." Among the amendments related to youth homelessness is the following: "Advance health and housing stability for unaccompanied youth experiencing homelessness and youth aging out of systems such as foster care and juvenile justice."   

Advice From a Former Foster Youth
After his stepfather physically abused him, 14 year-old Dam Le spent the next eight years going in and out of foster homes in Maryland. His experience in the foster care system was especially difficult because he was diagnosed with bipolar disorder at 16. His advice to foster youth currently in the system is know your rights.

Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative
The Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative helps young people make successful transitions from foster care to adulthood. Child Trends will help the Initiative use and communicate its data to increase knowledge about the young people served, assess the effectiveness of the effort, and plan for future growth and development.      

Focus on Fathers
SCAN has developed a series of new materials to educate and empower male role models to connect with kids and prevent family violence.  

Exploring the Worlds of Adolescent Fathers
The father-son team of Mark and Andrew Kiselica (of Iona College and University of South Florida, respectively) say young fathers have not always gotten the help they needed because programs for teen parents have typically focused on teen moms. Other programs have focused on young dads’ shortcomings (their failure to pay child support, for example), or the fear of fathers that by participating in programs, they will cause their partners to lose federal benefits.   

We All Believe in Children: How Faith Groups and Human Service Organizations Can Connect, and Why We Need to Make it Happen
More than 50 guests joined SCAN for dialogue at the Mobilizing Connections to Strengthen Families event for faith communities and human services organizations in June.  

“Doing Hair” and Literacy in an Afterschool Reading and Writing Workshop for African-American Adolescent Girls
In the culture of adolescent African-American girls, doing hair is a social practice that represents power, creativity, and sometimes popularity. An article describes a three-month afterschool reading and writing workshop that focused on doing hair.  

Many Versions of Masculine: An Exploration of Boys’ Identity Formation through Digital Storytelling in a Afterschool Program
At a time when afterschool programs are under pressure to become extensions of the school day, research argues for recognition of and support for the different functions such programs can serve when structured as alternative spaces for learning and identity formation.  

Build Linguistic and Cultural Competence in Your Program
A brief from the Administration for Children and Families suggests that enhancing cultural competence in social service agencies requires a commitment to understanding another’s beliefs, morals and values, and being actively aware of what affects and holds value for clients. The National Clearinghouse on Families & Youth has made available other resources that boost linguistic and cultural competence.

Juvenile Justice
Annie E. Casey Foundation CEO Calls for States to Close “Youth Prisons”
President and CEO Patrick McCarthy said youth prisons undermine the development of young people who get into trouble with the law and expose them to grave dangers while failing to improve public safety.  

Re-Examining Juvenile Incarceration – High Cost, Poor Outcomes Spark Shift to Alternatives
A growing body of research demonstrates that for many juvenile offenders, lengthy out-of-home placements in secure corrections or other residential facilities fail to produce better outcomes than alternative sanctions. In certain instances, they can be counterproductive. Seeking to reduce recidivism and achieve better returns on their juvenile justice spending, several states have recently enacted laws that limit which youth can be committed to these facilities and moderates the length of time they can spend there. These changes prioritize the use of costly facilities and intensive programming for serious offenders who present a higher risk of re-offending, while supporting effective community-based programs for others.  

 ‘Terrible Racial Disparities’ Not Fixed With SD Juvenile Justice Reform
South Dakota took a hard look at juvenile justice, and found glaring problems with its system. The “Juvenile Justice Reinvestment Initiative Work Group’s Report,” issued in November 2014, resulted in the passing of State Bill 73 in January. The bill calls for an overhaul of South Dakota's juvenile justice system, including a 50 percent reduction of incarcerated youth by 2020. The question is whether that goal is adequate for Native American youth. Native youth are arrested less often than all other youth — but not in South Dakota. The Native population in South Dakota is 9%, but comprises almost 40% of the incarcerated youth.   

OJJDP Updates National DMS Data to Statistical Briefing Book
The OJJDP Statistical Briefing Book (SBB) has added new features to its National Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC) Databook. This application presents the national DMC data for the juvenile justice system and their Relative Rate Index Matrices that quantify levels of racial disparity introduced at various decision points within the system. Developed by the National Center for Juvenile Justice, the research division of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, SBB offers easy online access to statistics on a variety of juvenile justice topics.

Workshops & Webinars

Act Now Series: Governance, Leadership and Building a Strategic Board (July 15, 2:30 – 4 p.m.)
The webinar is the second in the Act Now Series, hosted by the Employment and Training Administration (ETA). Implementing WIOA requires effective leadership and the support of partners in the public and private sectors.  Board leaders are working with WIOA stakeholders to implement strategies that align programs and provide high quality service to employers and the workforce.  During this session we will consider how state and local leaders can attain program alignment, strengthen operations and support career pathways, talent development, and sector strategies.  

“Adult Ally” What Does it Mean to Parents? (July 16, 1 - 2:30 p.m.)
Join a public conversation featuring family and youth leaders openly discussing how they distinguish the role of parents from other supportive adults in their lives.  

Recovery and Supports for Women Involved with the Criminal Justice System (July 23, 3 – 4:30 p.m.)
The webinar centers on the unique experiences and barriers to recovery and re-entry into society that women often face during and after incarceration. The presentation is designed for anyone working with women who have experienced incarceration, including community and in-custody treatment and recovery service providers.  

Act Now Series: Customer Centered Design (July 29, 12 – 1:30 p.m.)
The third webinar in the Act Now Series is designed to inspire innovation at the local and state level in achieving customer centered design as part of implementing the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA). Design Thinking is a practical, repeatable approach to arriving at innovative solutions. The webinar will include an overview of Customer Centered Design, examples from peers about how it is currently being used in the workforce and human services systems, and how other federal agencies are using Design Thinking to innovate services to customers. The webinar is the launch of a bigger initiative designed to engage workforce leadership throughout the country in a three month process.  

Embedding Youth Development in Schools: A Thought Leader Conversation (July 31, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m.)
A thought-provoking discussion between Karen Pittman, co-founder and CEO of the Forum for Youth Investment, and Michele Cahill, one of the principal architects of New York Cities' redesigned high schools and funder while at the Carnegie Corporation, will highlight some of the country's most innovative high school reform initiatives and address big questions such as what does it take to get youth development practices embedded into the DNA of schools.  

Emerging Legal Issues with Technology (July 31, 3 – 4 p.m.)
The New York County Deputy Bureau Chief of Cybercrime and Identity Theft Bureau offers legal updates in the world of cybercrime and law enforcement efforts to subpoena and search for cell phone and computer evidence. Ms. Conn examines search warrant issues with a case study involving a massive disability retirement fraud case that spans several New York counties; and reviews issues and solutions for examining social media and cyber evidence, including cloud storage and encryption issues faced by prosecutors in the courtroom.  

Measuring Outcomes for the Next Generation of Healthy marriage and Relationship Education Programs (On Demand)
It can be difficult for at-risk youth to establish and maintain relationships. Healthy marriage and relationship education (HMRE) programs for youth aim to support the development of skills related to forming healthy relationships. These skills apply in romance and friendship, and even employability. Child Trends recently developed tools to help HMRE programs assess their outcomes and collect data from youth.