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 Youth Topics is a service of the Center for Children and Families, Department of Community and Human Services, City of Alexandria.  It is produced by Jacqueline Coachman, DCHS Office of Youth Services. 

Subscribe here. Make inquiries here. Youth Topics is posted online here. 

In the July 23 Edition: 

Events
T.C. Williams Summer Graduation Ceremony (July 31)
Brothers and Sisters of Children with Special Needs: Unique Concerns, Unique Opportunities (August 4)
National Night Out (August 5)
National Summit on Authentic Youth Engagement (August 5-6)
Crimes Against Children Conference (August 11-14)
Meet and Greet Mount Vernon Community School Administrative Team (August 13)
National League of Cities University Leadership Summit (August 13-16)
Moe’s Families Like Yours Fundraiser (August 14)
Alexandria Youth Leadership Conference (August 18-20)
Jefferson-Houston Ribbon Cutting (September 12)
Achieving Collective Impact: How Partnerships Change Community Outcomes (September 16-18)
Alfred Street Baptist Church Community Health Fair (September 27)
Global Youth Justice Training Institute (December 2-4) 

Careers/Volunteerism
Jefferson-Houston Leadership Survey
Alfred Street Baptist Church Accepting Applications for Feed the 5000 Project
Juvenile Justice Video Project
Young Artists Prize
Unilever Sustainable Living Young Entrepreneurs Awards
ProjectMED Video Challenge
Dollar General Afterschool Literacy Award
PreK-5 Teacher Development Grants
PreK-6 Classroom Research Grants
Teacher Professional Development Grants
Dissertation Fellowships in American Art
Seal of Distinction Awards
National Crime Victims’ Service Awards
Culture of Health Prize
Foundation for Women’s Wellness Fellowship Awards
Foundation for Women’s Wellness Research Awards 

Grantsmanship
DCHS Office of Youth Services Listing of Grant Opportunities
 

Research & Resources
Registration Open for Virginia Preschool Initiative
City Recreation Centers Available for Civic Engagement 
Alexandria Library Offers Summer Reading Programs
Alexandria Library Offers Free MP3 Music
Test Scores ‘Will Not Tell You Everything”
In 25 Years, U.S. Children Make Fragile Progress, Kids Count Analysis Finds
New Federal Data Show the Cost of College Tuition, School by School
Young People See College as Worthwhile But Overpriced
America’s Young Adults: Special Issue, 2014
New NCAA Guidelines Recommend Limiting Live-Contact Football Practices
Former U.S. Women’s Soccer Stars Seek to Limit Youth-Soccer Headers
Study Examines Injury Rates Among Middle School Athletes
Physicians Have ‘Ethical Duty’ to Educate Youths About Concussions
New School Health Model Incorporates ‘Whole Child’ Principles
Are Healthier School Lunches Winning Over Students?
Pilot Will Make It Easier for Schools to Buy Locally Grown Foods
Lead in Kids’ Blood Linked with Behavioral and Emotional Problems
ADHD and Substance Abuse: The Link Parents Need to Know
National Drug Early Warning System (NDEWS)
New CDC Teen Pregnancy Prevention Website
More Good News on Teen Births, But Work Left to Be Done
Online Courses on Reducing Underage Drinking
Researchers Question Autism Prevalence Rates from CDC
Report Urges High-Quality Teaching and Sustainable Funding for Early Education
Too Many Structured Activities May Hinder Children’s Executive Functioning
District of Columbia to Consider Ban on Pre-K Suspensions
Sharing Data is a Calculated Move
The Case of Including Girls in ‘My Brother’s Keeper’
Inequalities Linger 50 Years After Civil Rights Act
Plan to Improve American Indian Schools Faces Skepticism
Providing Safe Passage to Unaccompanied Children from Central America
Bilingual Safety Guides for Children and Teens
Medicaid & CHIP Fact Sheets
AFT Says Obama Must Force Arne Duncan to ‘Improve’ or to Resign
New Federal Report Reviews Extended Learning Time Research 

 Workshops & Webinars 
Beyond the Screening: Treatment Services under the Medicaid Benefit for Children and Adolescents (July 24)
Applying Gender-Sensitive Monitoring and Evaluation to Enhance Learning (July 29)
Cities Expanding Health Access for Children and Families (July 29)
District and State Consideration for Incorporating Expanded Learning into Competency-Based Systems (July 29)
Planning and Implementing Status Offense System Change (July 29) 

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Events

T.C. Williams Summer Graduation Ceremony (July 31)
The summer graduation ceremony will take place at 4 p.m. in the main campus auditorium (3330 King Street).  

Brothers and Sisters of Children with Special Needs: Unique Concerns, Unique Opportunities (August 4)
A free workshop for parents, educators, social workers, clinicians and service providers will take place from 9 a.m. until Noon in the HUB (Building 56) at George Mason University (4400 University Drive, Fairfax). A panel of adult brothers and sisters who have siblings with special needs will present information from 1-2:30 p.m. For additional information, call 703.204.3941. 

National Night Out (August 5)
National Night Out now involves over 37 million people and 16,000 communities from all fifty states, U.S. Territories, Canadian cities, and military bases worldwide. The traditional “lights on” campaign and symbolic front porch vigils have become a celebration across America with such events and activities as block parties, cookouts, parades, visits from emergency personnel, rallies and marches, exhibits, youth events, safety demonstrations and seminars to heighten awareness and enhance community relations. 

National Summit on Authentic Youth Engagement (August 5-6)
Over three hundred leaders will convene in Chicago to share best practices and emerging approaches for youth engagement that empowers young people. 

Crimes Against Children Conference (August 11-14)
The conference will provide training for professionals in government and nonprofit agencies in law enforcement, child protective services, social work, children’s advocacy, therapy, and medicine who work directly with child victims of crime.  

Meet and Greet Mount Vernon Community School Administrative Team (August 13)
Mount Vernon Community School has two new assistant principals, Cinja Canton and Liza Burrell-Aldana. Both will participate in “Meet-and-Greet” community meetings of the administrative team at 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. at the school. 

National League of Cities University Leadership Summit (August 13-16)
The summit, which will take place in Silicon Valley, will explore the connection between leadership and innovation. 

Moe’s Families Like Yours Fundraiser (August 14)
A fundraiser to benefit foster/resource parents in the Washington Metropolitan region, including Resource Families of the City of Alexandria, will be held at Moe’s Southwest Grill (7698 Richmond Highway) from 5-8 p.m. Ten percent of the sales will be donated to the Families Like Yours campaign. 

Alexandria Youth Leadership Conference (August 18-20)
The conference sponsored by the Alexandria Campaign on Adolescent Pregnancy (ACAP) and the Substance Abuse Prevention Coalition of Alexandria (SAPCA) will take place  from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. on August 18, 19 and 20 at First Baptist Church (2932 King St). Completed applications should be forwarded to Lisette Torres. Information is also available on the ACAP and SAPCA websites. 

Jefferson-Houston Ribbon Cutting (September 12)
A ribbon-cutting and dedication ceremony for the new Jefferson-Houston School will take place at 10 a.m. in the gymnasium. Additional details will be announced. For more information, contact the ACPS Office of Communications and Public Relations at 703.619.8003.  

Achieving Collective Impact: How Partnerships Change Community Outcomes (September 16-18)
The focus of the three-day institute in St. Louis is how to create the five conditions for collective impact approaches through clear, sequenced steps: from partnership creation, community engagement, goal-setting and problem analysis to intervention design, implementation, evaluation, and improvement. 

Alfred Street Baptist Church Community Health Fair Ministry (September 27)
Free health screenings, health cooking demonstrations; private men’s and women’s sessions, open panel discussions, Bootcamp sessions, Reflexology, and  Yoga are among the activities that will be featured at the fair, to be held at Alfred Street Baptist (301 S. Alfred Street) from 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. 

Global Youth Justice Training Institute (December 2-4)
The event in Las Vegas will share strategies to establish and enhance local youth justice diversion programs through teen, student, youth, and peer courts and peer juries. Topics will include training youth and adult volunteers; providing quality community services, programs and referrals; conducting mock family intake meetings, and grant writing.  

Careers/Volunteerism 

Jefferson-Houston Leadership Surveys Available at Recreation Center
The Jefferson-Houston School Principal Leadership Survey is available online.  

Alfred Street Baptist Church Accepting Applications for Feed the 5000 Project
Alfred Street Baptist Church is accepting applications for the Feed the 5000 Project in September. One week’s worth of free groceries will be given to registered participants. Register online or apply at the Alexandria Department of Community and Human Services (2525 Mount Vernon Avenue). 

Juvenile Justice Video Project
September marks the 40th anniversary of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act, which set standards and core protections for youth in state juvenile justice systems. SparkAction, the Act 4 Juvenile Justice Campaign, and partner organizations are collecting 40 short, engaging video stories – the voices of youth, law enforcement, advocates and other experts – to illustrate how the law has created safer alternatives and outcomes, and the ways it must be improved and enforced. Lend your voice to this project.  

Young Artists Prize 
The National YoungArts Foundation provides emerging artists between the ages of 15 and 18 (or in grades 10-12) with opportunities to work with renowned mentors, access to significant scholarships, national recognition and a grant of up to $10,000. The deadline for applications is October 17. 

Unilever Sustainable Living Young Entrepreneurs Awards
The awards support young people with practical and innovative solutions to some of the world’s biggest sustainability challenges. The competition is open to anyone aged 30 and under from anywhere in the world with scalable and sustainable products, services, or applications that reduce environmental impacts, improve health and well-being, or enhance livelihoods through changes in practices or behaviors. 

ProjectMED Video Challenge
The Association of American Medical Colleges is challenging medical schools and teachers to form a three-to-six person team (led by a medical student or resident in partnership with community members) to produce a five-minute video proposing an innovative approach to engaging  individuals within the K-12 public education system.  Videos must illustrate an innovative, inclusive, community-based project that works with the K-12 education system to diversify the pool of future physicians and scientists. The top three video entries will receive seed funding ($7,000 for first place, $5,000 for second place, and $3,000 for third place) for the institutions to implement the approach in their respective communities. The deadline for submissions is September 5. 

Dollar General Afterschool Literacy Award
The Afterschool Alliance and the Dollar General Literacy Foundation are seeking nominations for afterschool programs that have excelled in providing literacy support to middle school students for the first ever Dollar General Afterschool Literacy Award. The winner will receive $10,000 for their program. Nominations will close August 15. 

PreK-5 Teacher Development Grants
The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics is accepting applications for grants of up to $3,000 that will be awarded to one or more individuals currently teaching at the preK-5 level for a professional development plan that improves his/her competence and student learning. While the grant does not fund the purchase of technology, proposals involving the use of technology to enhance student learning are encouraged. The deadline for applications is November 7. 

PreK-6 Classroom Research Grants
The program of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics supports classroom-based research in pre-college mathematics education in collaboration with college or university educators. Grants of up to $6,000 will be awarded to math educators or classroom teachers currently teaching math at the preK-6 grade level. Applications are due November 7. 

Teacher Professional Development Grants
The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics is receiving applications for professional development grants designed to improve the teaching competence of one or more classroom math teachers. Persons currently teaching mathematics in grades 6-8 are eligible for grants of up to $3,000. The deadline is November 7. 

Dissertation Fellowships in American Art 
Ten fellowships providing stipends of $25,000 as well as a travel allowance of up to $2,000 are available for graduate students in a department of art history in the United States at any stage of their Ph.D. dissertation research or writing. Candidates must have a dissertation focused on a topic in the history of visual arts of the United States. The online application system opens in late July; applications are due October 22. 

Seal of Distinction Awards 
The annual award program of the Call of Duty Endowment recognizes nonprofit veterans support organizations that demonstrate the highest levels of effectiveness in connecting recent military veterans with meaningful career opportunities. In addition to receiving the endowment’s seal of distinction, selected organizations will be awarded unrestricted grants of $30,000 as well as operational advice and support with the opportunity to receive additional restricted funding to encourage further growth. Nominations will be accepted until August 5. 

National Crime Victims’ Service Awards
The Office of Victims of Crime is accepting nominations for awards that recognize individuals and organizations who demonstrate outstanding service in support of child protection and prevention of juvenile victimization. Nominations must be received by August 6. 

Culture of Health Prize
The annual program of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation honors outstanding community efforts and partnerships that are helping people live healthier lives. Up to ten communities across the United States will be awarded $25,000 in cash. Community partners decide together how to use the funds to benefit the community. Applications must be received no later than September 17. 

Foundation for Women’s Wellness Fellowship Awards
 A nonprofit charity that works to improve women’s health by raising support for innovative early stage research and education is accepting applications for one-time grants of $3,000 to recognize and support M.D. / Ph.D. students and junior investigators (fellows, residents, assistant researchers) working at accredited U.S. medical institutions on women’s health related research. The deadline for Letters of Inquiry is August 15. 

Foundation for Women’s Wellness Research Awards 
Letters of Inquiry are being accepted for small, short-term studies with the potential to improve medical knowledge related to women’s health. The foundation will award grants of up to $25,000 for projects focused on cardiovascular disease, top female cancers, the role of hormones in disease and stage-of-life health issues such as pregnancy and menopause, and topics disproportionately affecting women. The deadline is August 15. 

Grantsmanship

DCHS Office of Youth Services Listing of Grant Opportunities
The DCHS Office of Youth Services compiled a listing of grant opportunities on July 9 and July 16 . 

Research & Resources

Registration Open for Virginia Preschool Initiative 
ACPS provides a free preschool program for eligible children who will be 4 years old by September 30. The Virginia Preschool Initiative (VPI) is a full-day (8 a.m. to 2:35 p.m.) preschool program that includes breakfast and lunch and may include before and afterschool care programs. Pre-registration for the 2014-15 school year is now open from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday-Friday at the Office of English Language Learner Services (1340 Braddock Place).  

City Recreation Centers Available for Civic Engagement 
In support of the City of Alexandria’s civic engagement initiative, the Department of Recreation, Parks and Cultural Activities (RPCA) is designating specific rooms for “no fee’ use at the Lee Center, Charles Houston, Durant, William Ramsay and Mount Vernon recreation centers. This use is during normal operating hours and will require no additional set-up activities. Reservations are on a first-come, first-served basis; cannot extend for longer than three months; and are limited to up to two uses per month per group to accommodate increased use by the community and to support RPCA programming. For more information, see Fee Guidelines for Groups Renting Facilities and Equipment. 

Alexandria Library Offers Summer Reading Programs
Alexandria Library offers "Fizz, Boom, Read"-themed summer reading programs for ages 0 to 18. Parents can register preschoolers for SummerQuest, Jr. and attend fun programs such as funny puppet shows and lively music concerts. Children between the ages of 6 and 12 can sign up for the SummerQuest reading challenge. Each participant receives a special prize after reading 10 books. Students between the ages of 12 and 18 may register for the "Spark a Reaction" Teen Reading Challenge. After logging in five or more books, their names will be entered in a raffle to win one of four $50 gift cards. Rising sixth- and seventh-grade students may sign up for either "Fizz, Boom, Read" for ages 6-12 or for the teen program, "Spark a Reaction." Check the events calendar for more information on special events for all ages. 

Alexandria Library Offers Free MP3 Music
Alexandria Library now offers free MP3 music file downloads on its website through Freegal Music, a collection comprised of music from more than 28,000 labels with music that originates in more than 80 countries. There is no software to download, and there are no digital rights management (DRM) restrictions. The music files are compatible with PCs, Macs, Apple, Android and other MP3-compatible mobile and portable devices. Registered cardholders are eligible for five free permanent downloads per week using their library card numbers and can stream music for three hours per day. To obtain a library card, fill out an application online or in person at any library branch. For further information, contact Linda Wesson at 703-746-1701. 

Test Scores ‘Will Not Tell You Everything’
Accompanying the standardized test results of students of a primary school in the U.K. was a letter from members of the faculty that included these words: “These tests do not always assess all of what it is that make each of you special and unique. The people who create these tests and score them do not know each of you the way your teachers do, the way I hope to and certainly not the way your families do”. 

In 25 Years, U.S. Children Make Fragile Progress, Kids Count Analysis Finds
In its 25th edition of the Kids Count Data Book, the Annie E. Casey Foundation found U.S. children improving on 10 out of 16 indicators, particularly in education and health, even after taking the economic downturn into account. But children’s and parents’ gains are precarious as families continue to sink into poverty and wide racial gaps remain. 

New Federal Data Show the Cost of College Tuition, School by School
The U.S. Department of Education has updated lists that provide information on the costs to attend some 4,300 higher education institutions as part of an annual effort to make costs more transparent and to give families and students more information to pick a college that is the right cost for them. 

Young People See College as Worthwhile But Overpriced
According to the 2014 Reason-Rupe survey, 79% of the respondents (who ranged in age from 18 to 29) believe that colleges could provide the same quality of education at a lower price. Nineteen percent said current tuition levels are necessary to maintain the quality of education. More than half of the respondents (54 percent) agreed with the idea that colleges could cut the number of administrators without harming the quality of education for students. 

America’s Young Adults: Special Issue, 2014
The one-time report on young adults in the United States ages 18–24 was published by the Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics. Findings highlight data trends and snapshots of the education, health and well-being of this population as they transition to adulthood. 

New NCAA Guidelines Recommend Limiting Live-Contact Football Practices
New guidelines released by the NCAA and the College Athletic Trainers’ Society recommend limiting live-contact football practices (defined as “any practice that involves live tackling to the ground and/or full-speed blocking”) to two per week during the regular season, postseason, and bowl season. For preseason, the NCAA guidelines suggest that institutions which hold two-a-day practices should be limited to live-contact practices only once per day. 

Former U.S. Women’s Soccer Stars Seek to Limit Youth-Soccer Headers
A group of former U.S. women’s soccer stars have teamed with the Sports Legacy Institute and the Institute of Sports Law and Ethics to announce a new initiative called Parents and Pros for Safer Soccer. They are calling for all middle school soccer teams and under-14 soccer leagues to ban heading in an attempt to reduce the risk of concussions. 

Study Examines Injury Rates Among Middle School Athletes
Middle school athletes of both genders are less likely to sustain injuries than their high school or collegiate counterparts, but female student-athletes in the middle grades are at significantly higher risk of mild injury during practices than games, according to a new study published online in the Journal of Athletic Training. 

Physicians Have ‘Ethical Duty’ to Educate Youths About Concussions
A paper released in advance of the academy’s upcoming Sports Concussion Conference provides guidance to physicians who work with youth-athletes regarding the handling of concussions. It examines both the legal and ethical duties of healthcare providers when working with potentially concussed youth. 

New School Health Model Incorporates ‘Whole Child’ Principles
Federal officials and health experts unveiled a new school health model called Whole School, Whole Community, Whole Child that incorporates "whole-child" element such as  school climate issues, student engagement, and community involvement with components of the more traditional coordinated school health model that has been widely used since it was introduced in 1987. The CDC released new materials about the connections between student health and academic achievement coinciding with the release of the school health model. 

Are Healthier School Lunches Winning Over Students?
According to two newly released national surveys of school administrators, students have eventually warmed up to the healthier fare prescribed by new federal meal standards. Students are complaining less and eating as much as they did before the rules went into place. 

Pilot Will Make It Easier for Schools to Buy Locally Grown Foods
The U.S. Department of Agriculture is accepting applications for a new pilot program that will grant participants the flexibility to use a portion of the federal funds allotted to them for commodities purchases to buy fresh, locally grown fruits and vegetables for their lunches. The Pilot Project for Procurement of Unprocessed Fruits and Vegetables, authorized by the 2014 Farm Bill, will include up to eight states across five regions. Schools in participating states will be able to state a geographic preference for where the foods they purchase with the federal dollars are grown.  

Lead in Kids’ Blood Linked with Behavioral and Emotional Problems
According to research funded by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, emotional and behavioral problems show up even with low exposure to lead, and as blood levels increase in children, so do the problems. Blood level concentrations measured in more than 1,300 preschool children in China were associated with increased risk of behavioral and emotional problems, such as being anxious, depressed, or aggressive. 

ADHD and Substance Abuse: The Link Parents Need to Know
Children with ADHD are more likely than peers to develop substance use disorders. Treatment with stimulants may reduce the risk of substance use disorders, but stimulants are a class of medication with significant abuse and diversion potential. The objectives of the clinical report published by the American Academy of Pediatrics were to present practical strategies for reducing the risk of substance use disorders in patients with ADHD and suggestions for safe stimulant prescribing. 

National Drug Early Warning System (NDEWS)
The Center for Substance Abuse Research (CESAR) will be working with NIDA to develop an innovative public health surveillance system that will identify new drugs and drug trends as they emerge. The project will focus on new drugs such as synthetic cannabinoids (Spice/K2) and designer stimulants (Molly), and changes in the use of more traditional drugs such as heroin. 

New CDC Teen Pregnancy Prevention Website
The CDC Division of Reproductive Health has enhanced their Teen Pregnancy Prevention website with a new web page especially for teens and designed with input from teens. Additions to the page for health care providers include a revised teen-friendly clinic graphic available for download, printing and distribution, and a video discussing how health care professionals can help further reduce teen pregnancy rates. 

More Good News on Teen Births, But Work Left to Be Done
A new report from the National Center for Health Statistics shows that the rate of teenage childbearing in the United Sates fell last year to 26.6 births per 1,000 females aged 15 to 19, which is the lowest level on record. Since the 1990s, the teen birth rate has fallen by nearly 60%. 

Online Courses on Reducing Underage Drinking
OJJDP’s Underage Drinking Enforcement Training Center (UDETC) is offering online distance learning courses on best practices and strategies for enforcement of underage drinking laws and efforts to reduce underage drinking. The free courses are designed to help states, territories, and local communities reduce youth access to alcohol. Topics include reducing alcohol sales to minors through compliance check operations, effective environmental prevention strategies to address underage drinking, preventing and safely dispersing underage drinking parties. 

Researchers Question Autism Prevalence Rates from CDC
It was the conclusion of the Centers for Disease Control that autism spectrum disorder was now found in 1 in 68 children, an upward spike in autism prevalence since in 2008 when the estimate was approximately 1 in 88 children. In the July issue of the journal Autism, the editors of the publication argue that the CDC numbers can't provide a meaningful estimate because they are based on a review of records for a child, not an independent assessment. The records themselves could be over- or understating the existence of a disorder because of local policies, resources and awareness. 

Report Urges High-Quality Teaching and Sustainable Funding for Early Education
A report by New America Foundation advised fixing the birth-through-grade 3 care and education system requires streamlining disparate programs and funding sources, and a renewed focus on high-quality interactions between young children and the adults around them. The policy brief includes eight overarching recommendations and within each are steps that can be taken by federal and state lawmakers, school districts, teachers, and principals. 

Too Many Structured Activities May Hinder Children’s Executive Functioning
Psychologists at the University of Colorado and the University of Denver studied the schedules of 70 six-year olds and found the kids who spent more time in less-structured activities had more high-developed self-directed executive function. Self-directed executive function develops mostly during childhood and it includes any mental processes that help us work toward achieving goals – like planning, decision making, manipulation information, switching between tasks, and inhibiting unwanted thoughts and feelings. Children with higher executive function will be healthier, wealthier, and more socially stable throughout their lives. Structured activities are defined as anything organized and supervised by adults. Less-structured activities are those in which the child is in charge of deciding what to do and figuring out how to do it. 

District of Columbia to Consider Ban on Pre-K Suspensions
The U.S. Department of Education’s Civil Rights Data Collection for the 2011-12 school year is the first to track suspension rates for Pre-K students. As described by Education Week: “The Civil Rights Data Collection for the 2011-12 school year shows that more than 8,000 public preschoolers were suspended at least once, with black children and boys bearing the brunt of the discipline. Black youngsters make up about a fifth of all preschool pupils but close to half the children suspended more than once. Boys of all races represent 54% of the preschoolers included in the report but more than 80% of those suspended more than once. A council member in the District of Columbia plans to introduce legislation  that would prohibit the city’s charter school and traditional public schools from suspending or expelling prekindergarten students in most situations. 

Sharing Data is a Calculated Move
Public schools and out-of-school time (OST) providers in Nashville share data about nearly 1,500 of the city’s neediest youth, including grades, formative assessment performance data, participation in afterschool programs and survey results about their developmental assets. Twice a year dozens of school and OST staffers meet to talk about the data and how to use it to align services with student needs.  

The Case of Including Girls in ‘My Brother’s Keeper’
Many women and girls of color believe President Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper initiative is unfairly overlooking their gender. A fact sheet about the initiative notes that “boys of color are too often born into poverty and live with a single parent. Too many of these boys and young men will have negative interactions with the juvenile and criminal justice system, and the dream of a college education is within the grasp for too few”. But according to proponents of expanding the initiative, those problems are also true for girls of color. 

Inequalities Linger 50 Years After Civil Rights Act
Fifty years after signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Julian Barnes, NAACP chairman emeritus, said many students’ knowledge of the civil rights era can be boiled down to two names and four words: Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks, and “I have a dream”. At an event at Howard University, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan praised some accomplishments in education over the past five decades, but said there is much to do. In particular, he mentioned the persistence of the school-to-prison pipeline, not enough widespread access to early-childhood education, and a lack of resources and advanced classes in school with high minority populations. 

Plan to Improve American Indian Schools Faces Skepticism
To make good on a new pledge to dramatically improve the federally funded schools that serve nearly 50,000 American Indian children, the Obama administration must overcome profound distrust among tribal leaders and community members who are more accustomed to the federal government reneging on its promises. Called the “Blueprint for Reform”, the plan calls for a reorientation of the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) from an agency that operates schools from Washington to a “school improvement organization” that delivers resources and support services to schools that are locally controlled by tribes. The executive director of a group of tribal schools located on reservations across South Dakota said it would be difficult to convince some American Indian educators that the BIE has good intentions with the reorganization. 

Providing Safe Passage to Unaccompanied Children from Central America
The fact sheet published by Bridging Refugee Youth & Children’s Services (BRYCS), a project of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, provides an overview on the current situation, information on the underpinnings of their work promoting permanency through family reunification and foster care, and information on how to help. 

Bilingual Safety Guides for Children and Teens
When unaccompanied immigrant children enter Federal custody, most are placed in the care of the Division of Children’s Services (DCS) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of Refugee Resettlement. Residential care provided by ORR is based on child welfare priorities and ranges from foster care to secure facilities. The guides for children and teens are the first publications created for the unaccompanied youth themselves and will help young people know their rights while they are in the United States. 

Medicaid & CHIP Fact Sheets
To help support outreach and enrollment efforts, the Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services is offering a set of fact sheets that are aimed at helping consumers understand the basics: Who is eligible for Medicaid and CHIP? What benefits do the programs provide? How can individuals enroll? 

AFT Says Obama Must Force Arne Duncan to ‘Improve’ or to Resign
The American Federation of Teachers passed a resolution calling on President Obama to put U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan on an “improvement plan” and demand his resignation if he does not change positions the union deems harmful. A similar resolution by the National Education Association called for Duncan’s immediate resignation. 

New Federal Report Reviews Extended Learning Time Research
A new U.S. Department of Education review of extended learning time research aims to help districts and schools figure out which approaches are most likely to prove beneficial. Overall, the report finds mixed academic results from the thirty studies it examined. But it highlights some promising design features, including the use of certified teachers for the extra time and targeting the initiatives to specific student needs, such as reading instruction.  

Workshops & Webinars

Beyond the Screening: Treatment Services Under the Medicaid Benefit for Children and Adolescents (July 24, 2 - 3 p.m.)
State Medicaid programs offer a variety of treatment services to meet the needs of children with physical and behavioral health conditions. Hear a federal perspective from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services on how states can leverage the Medicaid benefit for children and adolescents to meet the treatment needs of children. 

Applying Gender-Sensitive Monitoring and Evaluation to Enhance Learning (July 29, 9 – 10 a.m.)
This webinar will provide practical examples of how gender-sensitive M&E can be done and what difference it makes for youth development programs. Participants will learn how to be more gender-sensitive during the development of their M&E plan, data collection, and analysis. 

Cities Expanding Health Access For Children and Families (July 29, 2 – 3:15 pm)
The webinar will share insights regarding how city leaders can develop outreach strategies to connect children and families to health insurance. It will also include a review of new research from the Urban Institute on how American cities benefit when more residents have health insurance. Lastly, the webinar will share highlights from the National League of Cities Expanding Health Access for Children and Families initiative which recently selected eight cities to receive grants and technical assistance to develop city-led outreach and enrollment campaigns. 

District and State Consideration for Incorporating Expanded Learning into Competency-Based Systems (July 29, 1 – 2:15 p.m.)
Education systems across the country are beginning to experiment with competency-based models in which students advance based upon mastery. The webinar will highlight the role districts and states can play in facilitating this shift and discuss the policy barriers and opportunities at play.  

Planning and Implementing Status Offense System Change (July 29, 1 – 2 p.m.)
The webinar will provide an overview of how to plan and implement system change that best meets local needs, highlighting the experiences of two jurisdictions as they tackled key questions to design their reform. 

 

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Domestic Violence
703.746.4911

Child Protective Services
703.746.5800
or State
 1.800.552.7096

Adult Protective Services
703.746.5778